Beijing Harper Lecture Featuring Prof. Judith Farquhar

Sorting China’s Many Medicines

Cost:
¥138/person

¥69/recent graduate (College alumni of the past 10 years and graduate alumni of the past five years)

Free for UChicago graduates from the current academic year


Registration Required: https://alumniandfriends.uchicago.edu/harper-lectures/spring2017/beijing

 


Studying medical pluralism in practice can teach us much about the relations between medicine and culture, doctors and patients, clinics and their social contexts. China has enjoyed a plural medical landscape since the 1950s, given the early recognition of traditional Chinese medicine as a legal and state-supported health care modality.

Anthropologist Judith Farquhar, AM’75, AM’79, PhD’86, explores the explosion of new—and old—medical systems in China since the early 2000s, when the national government began to encourage the development of minority nationality medicine. Why and how do local healers, minority historians, ethnic activists, and local health department leaders enthusiastically produce new knowledge technologies concerning disease, therapies, bodies, and medical social relations?

 

RSVP Required

Event Details
2:00 p.m. Registration and networking
2:30 p.m. Presentation and discussion
3:30 p.m. Reception

¥138/person
¥69/recent graduate (College alumni of the past 10 years and graduate alumni of the past five years)
Free for UChicago graduates from the current academic year
Two complimentary registrations for members of the Chicago, Harper, Phoenix, and Medical and Biological Sciences Alumni Association philanthropic societies

Parking Information
Available at the hotel for ¥8/hr

Judith Farquhar, AM’75, AM’79, PhD’86, is Max Palevsky Professor Emerita in the Department of Anthropology and faculty director of the University’s Center in Beijing. Her research on contemporary China spans three decades, focusing on theories and practices of modern traditional Chinese medicine; the anthropology of everyday life and embodiment; and, most recently, national movements to systematize the traditional medicine practices of China’s ethnic minorities. She is the author of Knowing Practice: The Clinical Encounter of Chinese Medicine (1994), Appetites: Food and Sex in Post-Socialist China (2002), and Ten Thousand Things: Nurturing Life in Contemporary Beijing (2012).

 

 

 


 

Event Contact
Harper Lectures
harperlectures@uchicago.edu